European setback

by & filed under News Review.

Here you are, like pigs at the content trough, waiting for a delicious serving of Arsenal news.

Well, it’ll be slim pickings today because I am writing this at night because we made a podcast. This is the main course, the podcast will be the dessert… and the fact that you are willing to eat dessert at breakfast says a lot about your state of mind right now

My state of mind is shabby. I am BORED of not spending time with other people. I am DISGUSTED that I am not watching sport. I was THRILLED that football was coming back in Europe… but those hopes are getting dashed up by those meddling EU leaders.

The first to kick the legs away from the football fans was Emmanuel Macron. The handsome man who was dabbling with cougars well before the term was popularised dropped his elite pedigree points by a margin when he announced that there would be no football until at least September. That means the league is basically over. TV firms don’t want to wait around apparently, so the game is up in France. PSG talking about playing Champions League games in another country (I bet they are).

WILLIAM SALIBA COULD PLAY THIS SEASON IF THE PREM ROLLS INTO JULY.

Back to Euro football:

The French news had me tearing up in my bowl of breakfast dessert… then Germany made matters worse, with rumours swirling that an uptick in covid-19 cases, coupled with the scientific community calling the return dumb, would lead to a further delay on the return. Late May now looking more likely.

The Premier League is slightly different. The Government want the distraction, the Premier League desperately wants to fulfil its contractual obligations, and the fans are probably at the point where they don’t care much for the health implications. Not that I am saying that’s right, but look, Richard Masters just invited a new owner to the table who chopped up a critic with a bone saw… the Premier League is taking the high ground on nothing. It’s all about the pound notes my friends.

An Italian journo has fired back on the Thomas Partey denials saying that he’s up for a move and Atleti are desperate to sell players.

I really can’t be dealing with this back and forth, but the reality is we have no money. If Auba signs, that’s our meal ticket back into the market gone. Our only other big-ticket hope is Matteo, you’d have to hope that people don’t know about the bullshit behind the scenes, or that PSG are into that premium French youth vibe. You could pray that Simeone hasn’t seen Lacazette’s fitness or physicality levels.  Outside that, it’s slim pickings.

We spent this summers money last summer. Our wage bill is about £50m too high. We don’t have many players that’d sell in this climate. The bottom has fallen out of the market. Our players aren’t going to tolerate deferred wages or cuts if we’re splurging on recruits. It’s going to be a difficult summer that is unlikely to yield 26-year-olds in their prime.

I did hear that Mikel very much likes Pablo Mari. I was also told that though the Cedric Soares transfer looked very dodgy, he was actually flagged by our scouts as someone that fit the profile Mikel was looking for.

THE PROFILE: Is he on Kia’s books

Just jokes. He’s apparently the type of player we wanted. Make of that what you will. Doesn’t bode well for Hector, right?

Ok, wipe your eyes, put your headphones in and absorb my voice in your ears for the next 55 minutes. Pretend it’s an important Zoom call if your boss wants to meet.

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205 Responses to “European setback”

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  1. Dissenter

    Marc
    Of course life will resume,but it’s a bit silly to think this experience won’t change work cultish for a long time.
    Let me give you an example, the concept of working remotely is going to be a big part of our lives going forward. This pandemic has proven that many jobs don’t need to cram into an office space to work efficiently.
    Air travel was changed by September 11 – those changes still dominate the industry so don’t expect that this pandemic won’t change some things as well.

    Humanity has survived things far worse than this pandemic. Life will continue without doubt. I predict the global order will change; American prestige is irrevocably dented while China may emerge stronger than everyone else.

  2. Marc

    DNA

    Dissenter has a habit of always going for the worst possible outcome. Reality is life will go back to normal it always does.

  3. Marc

    Dissenter

    Of course there will be changes to what is normal – that’s progress. I agree I think we’ll see more people working from home after this than before but 30 years ago you’d send a fax – now you send an email.

    I do think Air Travel will be hit but haven’t we been told for years now we had to cut back on flying to stop climate change?

    The changes will just be a case of evolution.

  4. GunnerDNA

    Marc,

    “DNA

    Dissenter has a habit of always going for the worst possible outcome. Reality is life will go back to normal it always does”

    Until there is a vaccine its hard to predict what will be normal moving forward.

  5. Marc

    “Until there is a vaccine its hard to predict what will be normal moving forward.”

    Drinking beer, chasing women, watching football and hating Scousers which strangely is precisely what normal was before!

  6. GunnerDNA

    Marc,

    “Drinking beer, chasing women, watching football and hating Scousers which strangely is precisely what normal was before”

    That was from 1995 bro. The new wave now is owning properties, making sure the family is good and securing retirement

  7. Pierre

    Marc
    ” according to transfermarket Miki’s only got 3 assists not 4.”

    Your Clutching at straws mate…

    Sorry to say but I’ve made you look a mug again .

  8. Graham62

    Marc

    You seem to forget one thing, Football has lost a great deal of credibility these past couple of months. Things will never be as they were. A vaccine will not change people’s perceptions of things.

    On top of this, the entire structure of the game will be under scrutiny. European and international competitions will not be as they were for several seasons.

    I’m sorry but things will change massively, whether Football likes it or not.

  9. China1

    Oxford are 80% sure their vaccine will work, will know by July and will have millions of doses available by September if it does

    Remdesvir or whatever it’s called has also been found to have a positive impact for treatment

    There are now over 80 different vaccines being tested around the world and countless drugs and treatments

    There’s no way in hell this won’t be under control by the end of 2020. The question is how bad will the economy look by then

  10. Marc

    Graham

    We’ll see I just think any changes will be cosmetic, there will be changes to European matches and International competitions for the next couple of years with less travelling but the PL will in 2 years time will have that fuck wit on SSN on transfer deadline day doing exactly the same.

  11. Marc

    China

    Agree the tricky bit is going to be relaxing the lockdown over here whilst not causing a second wave before a vaccine is ready.

    What will be interesting is whether a vaccine is made compulsory or voluntary? Would there be limitations on people who refuse a vaccine?

  12. Graham62

    Based on the UK figures, how does anyone expect things to return to normality?

    Football will have to adjust to the reality of the situation.

  13. Dissenter

    Marc
    ‘Because things always return to normal – why can’t you understand that?”

    It depends on how you define ‘normal’ though.
    I’ve given you examples of situations where things don’t return back how it used to be.
    You’re stating the obvious because we all know life will continue. Life would have continued had there been a nuclear fall-out in the height of the cold war, millions would have died but there would have been a rebuilding.

  14. Paulinho

    “There’s no way in hell this won’t be under control by the end of 2020. The question is how bad will the economy look by then”

    But the WHO, and several hysterical posters, and have stated there thought there is no evidence of immunity?

    Orwellian doublethink/speak at its finest.

  15. Marc

    Dissenter

    We’ve gone round and round on this – as it stands approx. 230,000 have died globally from this, that’s less than 0.00003% of the worlds population.

    In a few years there will be numbers showing more died from the economic and other effects than died from the virus.

    More people will work from home – was going to happen anyway this has just accelerated it. Some people will be nervous of being in large crowds – they’ll get over it.

    The new normal will be almost identical to the old. Evolution not revolution.

  16. China1

    Well supposedly there isn’t evidence of immunity simply because it hasn’t been properly studied yet. But supposedly it would be extremely surprising if some level of immunity wasn’t gained, even if not long term.

    Tbf it doesn’t need to even be long term, even just a couple of months will make a big difference if we do get a vaccine from September onwards

    I think the problem is a combination of experts talking in isolation about the single point they’re focusing on and discounting the wider picture of technological, societal, medicinal progress happening at the same time – and secondarily that they want to down play expectations to a worst case scenario in case the best case doesn’t work out and they’re blamed for not delivering on earlier claims

    But really there’s a major lack of joining the dots happening across sectors which is making the forecasting look unnecessarily extreme in developed countries. How developing and third world countries manage will be another story entirely however

  17. Paulinho

    China – Agree that it’s extremely likely there is immunity which is why I wonder why the WHO, and others, are seemingly desperate to discount that possibility when natural herd immunity is touted and motivations for doing so.

  18. China1

    Taking the west’s perception of China’s cases as a case in point

    It keeps being talked of as incredulous that China would have had it under control and wouldn’t be collapsing under the weight of covering up a second wave, but again no one is paying attention.

    People from outside the country are bringing it back in – and they land in China and are immediately tested after getting off a plane and taken by guys in full PPE on a chartered bus to a government controlled hotel where they are legally made to isolate for 14 days and cannot leave their room until the 15th day and having passed a second test as negative.

    It’s really not rocket science.

    It only became legal to move between neighboring provinces without a 2 week self isolation about a week ago. We’re still having our temperature taken absolutely everywhere, digital health certificates etc.

    A better question would be how the virus would manage to stay rampant in a country that has had so many checks and balances on it.

    Rather than just being incredulous about the prospects of getting it under control, we just need the governments of the world to join the dots across sectors, take it seriously and track it properly and it will absolutely be under control shortly and the vaccine and better treatment are surely on the way this year

  19. Sid

    Immunity is evident in Africa, covid19 has been around worldwide earlier than being portrayed

    You heard it here 1st!

  20. Dissenter

    Marc
    “We’ve gone round and round on this – as it stands approx. 230,000 have died globally from this, that’s less than 0.00003% of the worlds population.”

    You keep posting fatality figures without any appreciation of the unprecedented public health measures it took to keep those numbers low.

    “In a few years there will be numbers showing more died from the economic and other effects than died from the virus.”
    I think you want to have it both ways. The US fatality numbers would be in the 2-4 million range [based on projections ] without the shut downs. Would that be a reasonable price to pay to keep the economy humming?

    Then again, you’re missing he obvious point that if the virus had been allowed to run loose unimpeded [like you seem to argue for]. It would have shut down society in an uncontrollable manner. It would have created massive hysteria and a real pandemic of fear in itself. People would still not go out to eat in a restaurant, or go watch a movie or board a commercial plane, regardless of whether the government shut things down. Boris tried doing it your way and he was forced to reverse course.

    The issue here is CONSUMER CONFIDENCE. People can think for themselves. They see what is happening and they can tell when their governments are spewing BS.

  21. China1

    Paulinho well I’m fearful that the natural herd immunity route is going to be the way for the developing world as there’s little hope for many of them managing to keep it under control through the usual means when living in relative, let alone abject poverty. That will come at a huge human cost which will probably be one of the great tragedies of this generation imo. I’m genuinely worried about that

    But for developed nations the virus will be broadly under control

  22. Dissenter

    China1
    What’s going to happen when international business resumes before the mass availability if a good vaccine?
    I ask because the situation is still very tenuous even in societies where they mounted an effective public health campaign.,they are seeing another wave of cases that stem from a few infected subjects that cross international borders.
    Does that mean international borders will be closed for a while? If so, what does tat do to global commerce?

    Mexico and Canada don’t want to open their borders to the US. They are the ones that may want to build a wall now.

  23. Dissenter

    I think much touted treatment of covid-19 that give industrialized countries an advantage hasn’t turned out to be effective. The $20,000 ventilators that separate the developing world from the industrialized countries haven’t exactly been that effective.
    People are more likely to follow the directives of government in the developing world so the public health piece will limit the spread in the first place.
    More people will die of malaria, thyphoid fever and other tropical communicable diseases than covid-19. More people will die of hunger than anything covid-19 could possible do.

  24. Paulinho

    China -Outside of age, it seems to target people with metabolic syndrome that comes with indulging on excess foods etc, so obesity, diabetes etc. Standard America diet. Virus causes oxidate stress leading to hypercoagulation in those risk groups.

    I don’t think it will have anywhere near the impact on those countries as people think it will because you don’t get the same physical profile in those places. Elderly still a concern though.

  25. Spanishdave

    Don’t forget that since week 1 this year 2000 people have died of flu and pneumonia per week.
    That’s with vaccine being available.
    According to the ONC if Coronavirus and pneumonia are on the death certificate the NHS put it down as a virus death.
    This inflates the deaths numbers which maybe the government prefer to keep the panic up and to justify their extreme measures.
    They are digging a big hole any hav’nt a clue how to get out of it.
    Boris is good at getting women pregnant though.! Lol

  26. Wardo

    Strong info From a mate of mine

    Premier league is back in June. I have a lead from someone who works for a sport travel agency that manages logistics for some top teams (spurs, city, wolves, newcastle, rangers to name a few). The company has been tasked to arrange hotels and travel for 8 weeks starting mid may.

    All premier league teams will play their remaining games at st georges park behind closed doors and for TV only. The complex will host 2/3 games a day that will be streamed live.

    The players will go into isolation mid may at select hotels in the vicinity of st georges and will train at local clubs grounds. They will not be able to see family and friends during the period of games. Each player will be tested regulary to ensure safety and hotels will be locked down for players only.

    Looks like we are going to have a world cup style June with loads of games to watch.

  27. Uwot?

    Reality? Think marcs reality is more tempered.facts speak for themselves re infection rates with regards to historic pandemics.Tending to be of an optimistic nature & considering the stampede to be first to knock out an effective vaccine I’d be reasonably confident of one being produced within next 3/ 4 months.Time will tell as always.

  28. Marc

    Dissenter

    There was a piece on the news over here last week (I think it was last week I’m completely losing track of the days!) about a hospital in Cheshire who have done a study and concluded that putting people on a ventilator who have Covid is bad for them and using the equipment that’s used for sleep apnoea is far more beneficial.

  29. Marc

    Dissenter

    I have not argued against the lockdown – My argument has been against the “it’s the end of the world” nutjobs – life will go back to normal.

    Whilst every death is a tragedy the numbers killed are in the scheme of things tiny. What I have commented on is what will happen when there is an effective / reliable anti body test if it’s shown millions upon millions have had it in the UK with no serious consequences? The actions taken will have killed more people than they would’ve saved – if it’s shown 200,000 people in the UK have had it and 100,000 die it’ll be the opposite.

  30. Ernest Reed

    The numbers you present have no true relevance, Marc. You state that a minuscule percentage are dying of C19 compared to other more common viruses and events.

    If one suggests that this is overblown and essentially little was done from the get-go, what do you think the number of fatalities would likely be, taking a global population into account?

    Perspective is an interesting phenomenon, perhaps you may want to consider it as an application.

  31. Ernest Reed

    Correction – If one suggests that this is overblown and IF essentially little was done from the get-go, what do you think the number of fatalities would likely be, taking a global population into account?

    Inclusion of IF

  32. Ernest Reed

    To which, the fact that global mortality rates are as low as indicated is a direct result of prudent oversight and wise application of safety protocols.

    Status quo, common sense would tell you, is the way to go..

  33. Marc

    Ernest

    I know you lost your wife and I’m sorry for that – I haven’t stated that actions shouldn’t have been taken.

    “what do you think the number of fatalities would likely be, taking a global population into account?”

    No idea because we still don’t know how many have had this with either zero or mild symptoms. I’ve asked the question what happens if it turns out that this has been about for longer than currently claimed – didn’t a University in California say they thought it’s possible that a viral outbreak last autumn was Covid 19 – and deaths amongst those outside of vulnerable groups are tiny what damage has been done to the economy – how many will be killed by the effects of the lockdown rather than the virus itself?

    These are not unreasonable questions.

  34. Marc

    Ernest

    ” If one suggests that this is overblown and IF essentially little was done from the get-go, what do you think the number of fatalities would likely be, taking a global population into account?”

    I don’t know – I haven’t made statement to the effect that I do.

    What I will say is Sweden has not implemented the extreme measures we have and the media has highlighted the fact that their death toll is higher than surrounding countries however you’d think that the death rate should be soaring but according to what’s shown on the daily briefing Sweden’s death toll is remaining relatively flat.

    Questions are not the enemy.

  35. Dissenter

    So now we are set to treat football like it’s some life critical societal need.
    Players away from their families for weeks, staying isolated in hotels. etc
    It will be fun just watching the sheer spectacle of greed on display. The football behind closed doors will resemble preseason games at best.
    It will be a massive skyscraper built from a deck of cards. A couple of positive tests leading to compulsory isolations and they will all have eggs on faces.
    I wonder how the players feel about being separated from their families to go play fight-football.
    Are they going to change the rules of association football to prevent contact or sanitize the ball every now and then during games?

  36. Dissenter

    Marc
    You’re the only self declared conservative who doesn’t believe in personal responsibilities.
    You don’t think people are capable of thinking for themselves to drive their own decisions?

  37. Sid

    Top states with obesity
    West Virginia (38.1 percent)
    Mississippi (37.3 percent)
    Oklahoma (36.5 percent)
    Iowa (36.4 percent)
    Alabama (36.3 percent)

    Top covid19 infections, death
    New York 299,691, 23,477
    New Jersey 116,365, 6,771
    Massachusetts 60,265, 3,405
    Illinois 50,358, 2,215
    California 48,829, 1,956

    There isnt any correlation of covid deaths to obesity
    Theres more to the story…….

    You heard it here 1st!

  38. Marc

    “You don’t think people are capable of thinking for themselves to drive their own decisions?”

    An awful lot of people aren’t – I only vote Tory because my personal preference isn’t available.

  39. China1

    Re the reopening of international business, a large chunk of what is just accepted to require international travel is more a luxury than necessity

    Taking standard chartered bank as a case in point, multinational travel is done by middle and senior management all the time as you’d expect but we’ve had a global travel ban since January with no discernible impact on the bank.

    Obviously that’s not universally the case for all companies but there is a big distinction between ‘the way things are done’ and they way things need to be done’ which I do think this pandemic is helping to underscore

    It’s more the tourism and travel industries are sadly going to take an absolute battering however as even when lockdowns are lifted 1) these are dead industries during lockdown 2) confidence in public safety will be lower in the short term after lockdown ends 3) changing ways of working will have some impact on business travel becoming seemingly less necessary 4) people and companies that do want to travel/indulge in those industries will have less disposable income to spend on it

  40. Ernest Reed

    The status quo, following strict guidelines, is the prudent approach in my opinion. There is no cure for Covid-19 and that is what makes this so unique and sadly, so deadly.

    I asked the question as a point of curiosity, because we have a reasonable idea of the current status (provided countries remain honest in their numbers) but one wonders what it could potentially have been without protective measures already in place?

    And its okay to bring up any subject around me. What has happened has happened, and i cant change that for all the world. This much i do know and remain adamant about, stay the course until a vaccine is found. I would not wish what happened to me and sadly my wife, on anyone. I have experienced many things in my lifetime but this one, carries a wallop like nothing i have ever encountered.

    Stay safe all, please.

  41. Tom

    Top states with obesity
    West Virginia (38.1 percent)
    Mississippi (37.3 percent)
    Oklahoma (36.5 percent)
    Iowa (36.4 percent)
    Alabama (36.3 percent)Top covid19 infections, death
    New York 299,691, 23,477
    New Jersey 116,365, 6,771
    Massachusetts 60,265, 3,405
    Illinois 50,358, 2,215
    California 48,829, 1,956There isnt any correlation of covid deaths to obesity
    Theres more to the story…….

    —————
    I’m no statistician but Im pretty sure that’s not how statistical analysis should work Sid.
    You’re heard it here first…….and free of charge.

  42. Tom

    Dissenter
    Your point is well taken but if bringing football back is what it will take to stop Marc and Spanish Dave’s hot takes on covid-19, than Im ready to proclaim it essential.
    Besides, it’ll be fun watching players getting in each other faces at corners.

  43. Graham62

    Wardo

    There’s absolutely no chance that football will start up again in June.

    The French have set a precedent.

  44. Valentin

    Marc,

    If stating the facts is having a meltdown, then I would not want to see you when facing reality of contracting COVID-19.

    Government has already stated that group activity will not be allowed until either we have a full treatment or we have a vaccine. So for public football to resume in September, 60% of the population (herd immunity) would have to been vaccinated by September.
    Assuming that the current vaccine works, it’s result will not be confirmed before June. That leave only 3 months to administer it to 60% of the UK population of 66 millions. That’s the equivalent of 435,000 vaccinations per day for 3 months. The government is currently struggling to administer 100,000 tests per day!

    Football behind close door may come back in September, but normal football will not resume any time soon. I doubt that it will resume this calendar year!

  45. Wardo

    Graham

    I think the prem will do everything they can to restart the epl

    Not sure if that message is true. Could be bs

  46. Dissenter

    Sergio Agueuro; “‘The majority of players are scared because they have family, they have children, they have babies, parents,’ he said.
    ‘When we go back, I imagine that we will be very tense, we will be very careful, and the moment someone feels ill, you will think: “What’s gone on there?” I hope there is a vaccine so all this ends.
    ‘It does scare me but I have just been here with my girlfriend. I haven’t had contact with other people.