Emery’s future: The balancing act

by & filed under News Review.

Oh come on people, I’m starting Monday morning on a HIGH.

Arsenal turned around a one goal deficit twice against Aston Villa with 10 men.

You can’t knock that, you really can’t. That’s finding a next level that feels very much born of last seasons 22 game unbeaten run.

Matteo G was an absolute monster. I’ve always been a fan of his, but I was unsure what his special sauce was. We’re starting to see that. He’s a leader. He drives games forward, he makes elite passes, he’s a beast when he wants to be, he’s a goal threat… he’s the player other players more senior than him look to for answers.

He is captain elect.

To slip back into misery for a second, we were predictably dross in the first half. Our midfield was there to be bypassed, there was no real leadership from our captain, and our defence was typically ponderous. We went a goal down to McGinn, he ghosted in after a ball bypassed about 6 players, his grazed touch easily sailed past Leno.

To make matters worse, AMN, who complained midweek about playing as a right-back made a stupid challenge for his second bookable offence and found himself taking an early shower. It was dim, but honestly, this right back experiment has been awful and it’s clear the player hates it so much he’s willing to break plates in a dishwashing disaster just to rid himself of the burden.

The second half saw Calum C introduced for Saka (who was good). With 10 men, we still looked a threat, but Villa were probing. We won a penalty, Matteo powering into the box, forcing Engel to shove him to the ground. Auba let Pepe take the penalty, the largely impressive Ivorian slotted it calmly down the middle for his first goal.

You’d have hoped Arsenal would hold their nerve, but we didn’t, we let Villa in, before attempting another embarrassing short goal-kick that saw a poor touch from Calum eventually lead to a Wesley goal. We’re such a mess on the pitch, that sort of carry-on is inexcusable.

Emery pushed the nuclear button and subbed his captain and Ceballos off on 72 for LT and Willock. It was an inspired decision. He invited athleticism and hunger onto the pitch and it created an entirely different vibe, even with one less man.

We clawed our way back on 81. Matteo fed a teasing ball to the back post, Chambers didn’t do well with his first attempt, but he poked a looping shot over the keeper at his second go and made it count. Superb work, and the perfect remedy for his earlier mistake.

The second goal came from an incisive Auba freekick. He really is worth his weight in gold, his experience in front of goal is absolutely invaluable to us at the minute. As someone said on the Twitter website, he’s a success key, when he’s in your side, you always have a chance.

The players celebrated the win like we’d just won the World Cup. I could be petty about the levels here, but to be honest, after the last few weeks, it’s nice to know they still care.

WHAT DID WE LEARN:

Granit Xhaka:

The team were booed off at halftime, Granit was booed off as a sub. Terrible. Awful. I hate to see it. But really, I don’t. He’s not our captain. He’s a joke. He is the single worst decision Emery makes each week without fail. I don’t care that it’s not nice, I don’t care that Arsenal class seems to generally be geared around beta males celebrating mediocre ideas and hearting cute Wenger allegories on Twitter, the reality is, Xhaka is a poor player and we need him to take gardening leave.

Bellerin would be a better captain… so would Matteo.

Athleticism:

Emery has a weird thing with hierarchy in his squad. Everyone could see that Saka was a better prospect than Reiss, but Reiss starts. We’re opting for Xhaka in our midfield despite three years of average. Let’s just call a rabona a rabona… our best midfield is Willock, LT and Matteo. It lacks experience, it’ll have bad days, but that’s the most explosive we can be. Emery needs to wake up to this. We need hunger, pace, power and output. Those three made a statement today in a short space of time, let them have a crack at United. Could it be a worse idea than 31 shots against Watford or getting shoved around by Villa for an hour?

Unai Emery:

I’ve been getting a mixed bag of messages on the manager from people that know. Some think he could be in danger. He’s clearly not connecting with the players, his ideas are average and though the table is telling a story… the story is a fucking lie. The table lies all the time, and if you think where we are now is a true reflection of what we can be, we’re OVER.

Others that I speak to say there is no chance of him leaving.

The rationale? He’s where he needs to be. The table is all that matters to Raul and Edu. The gut feel amongst a lot of people is this: We’re a better shade of shite when you look at the others. United are a mess, Chelsea are not a worry until next year, Spurs are having problems, and Leicester is a mirage.

The leadership team just want top 4 and they’re going to gamble that those around us are so bad, Emery will come out where he needs to be.

Hard to argue the logic.

We have a lot of easy games coming up, if Emery can shake things up, we will no doubt be in a threatening position when December lands. If we’re within spitting distance, he’ll keep his job. I think he’ll comfortably be in the mixer by then, because we have a lot of very, very good players.

Today’s turnaround was in spite of him… not because of him. I know that sounds petulant, but I think most get what I mean. Emery spent most of the second half rooted to that bench, twitching out like someone had dropped 2Gs of MD in his WKD at a Carl Cox Space reunion. That is not a good look. He has fear in his eyes, but I think the players are good enough to work around him, just like they did at PSG in season two when he basically gave up.

That doesn’t mean the inevitable fail won’t happen

… but that will only last so long, sustaining it until May is a longshot. But the club is risk-averse, Raul was a big part of Emery’s hiring, and things aren’t bad enough on paper yet to make a move.

I can see the rationale, but for me, the sooner we move him on the better. Skanking your way to 4th is not progressive. Betting your future on an average manager with conservative ideas will not take you to the promised land. The longterm damage a top 4 Emery will do to Arsenal is unthinkable, but there’s every chance it’ll happen.

That said, don’t underestimate Spurs and their ability to bounce back. Chelsea has a lot of good players, I think you’ll see a strong finish from them. United are a disaster, but they have good players, so a clever caretaker could be a threat.

I will celebrate the win today. I am very excited by the players we have but I cannot abide by this manager. He’s rank average and the win cannot disguise the performance, the decisions, or the consistency of bland we’ve seen over a season and 7 games.

On reflection, if the brief to replace Arsene was a pragmatist that could improve the defence, we really should have hired Conte. If that’s still the brief, then we should look at Allegri who now has a good grasp of English. Rip the plaster now… because no amount of tinkering will save us in January.

We won’t though… and that worries me.

See you in the comments.

 

794 Responses to “Emery’s future: The balancing act”

Jump to comment form ↓

  1. China1

    I see some people saying chambers should be dm. Let’s be real he’d probably do a much better job than xhaka and help guen a lot.

    Tho vs utd we’ll likely have AMN starting RB if chambers doesn’t so I think emery will put chambers RB

  2. China1

    In a couple of games when belle Tim is ready, I’d play a backline of

    ——————Leno
    Bellerin-holding-Luiz-tierney
    ———chambers-guen
    —————-ceballos
    Pepe—————————saka
    ——————-Auba

    Give it a try for 45 mins and see how it looks

    The good thing is that we actually have a lot of versatility in this squad. You can easily swap Luiz and chambers in that setup between CB and DM (which might be a better idea anyway)

    We also have willock who can swap in for guen or ceballos where desired

    Up front and wide forward we have several options out of Auba Pepe laca martinelli saka and RN

  3. Dissenter

    China1
    I’ve see enough of David Luiz to not shoehorn him into any starting 11.
    In retrospect, we may have been too harsh on Mustafi. He has his penchant for high profile mistakes but so do Luiz and Sokrates.

    I think Mustafi complements Holding better. It will work so long as we have Torriera sitting in from the backline, not Xhaka.

  4. Dissenter

    I would play Chambers-Mustafi-Holding-Tierney in the backline till Bellerin is ready.
    Either of Mustafi and Chambers can play the Bellerin position half-decently. They can inter-change during the course of the game.

  5. Tony

    Great win last night. I haven’t watched the game yet: still waiting for a download this morning, so I’ll read the comments later.

    It doesn’t absolve Emery of anything in my eyes.

  6. Gentlebris

    It’s high science how our ‘second team’ plays better than our ‘ first team’.

    Emery sure knows how to pick his first eleven for PL matches.

  7. Bojangles

    You can’t help but get excited over a 5-0 victory especially when handed up by our young players but let’s not get too carried away, this was not a first team Forest either.

    Tierney looks better that I thought he would be. If the improvement made in the four days since his u23’s runout is anything to go by the 25 mil paid for his services will prove to be the bargain of the season.

    “Arsene Wenger elevated Arsenal football club to a higher level than at any time in their history and the fans (WOBS) held him responsible for holding the club back .”

    I agree with Pierre in part. Wenger certainly elevated us to a higher level than we had been for many years (not sure about any time in our history, certainly in our pl history.) Unfortunately, due to this lofty position Arsenal fans have taken on a position of entitlement which of course is a position no club or fan can or should take. Just because we are The Arsenal does not entitle us to be a top six side. I feel confident in saying that the older Arsenal fans, those who were there during our mid table struggles, do not feel this way.

  8. PieAFC

    On the screens over here, when Saka was brought on. It showed at first Freddie giving Saka instructions for a period of time, then Emery added something smaller.

    I think Emery isn’t this naive. He’s seen enough of a reaction from certain players now to obtain levels from other payers are not cutting it.

    Ozil couldn’t even clap when he left the field. He must really hate how he was thrown in with the youngsters and proved how far he’s fallen.

    – attitude does that to you.

  9. PieAFC

    I think the youth are up for it more. Years gone by, they were hyped too much, crashed out in competitions or failed to make an impact when they should have.

    A lot of them know they work hard, they will get chances and can go as far as their performances let them.

  10. Tony

    Charlie
    Saw your comments late last night.

    Completely agree with your Allegri then Vieira thinking.

    Some time ago I read in a broadsheet UK newspaper an argument put forward that a BA gained in the UK adds too much debt for its viability to a student where it takes around 10 years to pay off the student debts. The argument was asking if a BA today was really worth the debt and pain and misery vs. what real opportunities it affords the student.

    It went on to illuminate the ways employers did far more penetrating background checks on potential candidates, such as delving deeply into a person’s social media, taking a hair sample for drug testing and much more I can’t remember this morning. Combined with this are a series of test that evaluate the potential employees’ mental and emotional ambiguity/stability/adroitness as well as tests for other suitability factors.

    It was a thought evoking and well-put together argument article.

    Thailand last year made a new law that employers had to pay a minimum of 15,000 THB (around £320) a month for an under graduate employee.

    Without a degree a person would have to work as a footpath seller: food or otherwise or do something self-employed, such as a tour guide or manual labour.

    Sadly, the BA is of limited value because of its devaluation due to it being gained by the masses. I’d suggest that a BA today is the equivalent of the old ‘O’ and ‘A’ levels.

    Only a graduate degree will get you through to interviews for 1st line management positions, which seem to be very prevalent in the current academic climate.

    I often talk to some of our Rotary Club member employers where the general consensus is that degrees are too easily obtainable, but yet still a prerequisite to be considered for an interview.

    I can substantiate this much further as I was involved in management training for government senior agency departments’ senior management personnel and corporations foreign/local here as well as writing Master degree management syllabus case studies (for one of the top Unis here) gaining from my 25+ years of international business, in a similar way I believe to the Harvard model some years ago.

    Whether it is still used now I have no idea. Perhaps Bamford can spread light on this.

    When I arrived here in 1999 Thai management structures were still ‘Top Down’ where I was tasked with instructing horizontal structures used then & today. This was made exceedingly difficult at first because of the Thai “Greng Jai” hierarchy/age culture that would take too long to explain here.

    http://phil.uk.net/thailand/greng-jai.html

    There have been some interesting comments from my post yesterday, so I’ll state my belief here on this.

    ‘Gaining a degree shows an employer that you are able to study for 3/4 years where one takes in the information and then regurgitates it for mid and final exams.’

    Regardless of a person’s transcripts and final GPA the degree does not explain a person’s intellect or their ability to use what they have learnt.

    My experience over my 40+ years career is that the higher one’s education the further they are likely to be on the spectrum. No disrespect meant to PhD2020 or any other PhD here.

    It seems the higher one goes up the spectrum the less filtered, less patient and more anal they become. Doctors are good indicators of this as are professors. I have a few friends who are doctors and my heart team of 8 years are also people I’m very close to.

    This includes both my wife and me. We both have a hyperactivity trait with limited filters and this has been passed to our son who has ADHA and will possibly need home schooling due to his focus issues. He’s no savant but in some areas he is vastly ahead of his years, such as his English ability is that of a freshman at Uni as his math’s abilities.

    Our 21-year-old adopted daughter (wife’s niece) says our filters less discussions heated or otherwise are not to be missed.

    With your correct devalued degree thinking in mind, my wife and I had some tough talks with our daughter regarding her future. Fortunately she excels at maths and science/technology where she eventually decided to go into a form of engineering because of potential work/career longevity for the next 40 years.

    This led her to choosing a double degree program of Aerospace Engineering and business (probably same as my wife: MBA) in Bangkok and Australia.

    The cost is £150, 000 for the 2 degrees and probably won’t stop there because I offered for her to train to be a pilot after graduating from both degrees. My thinking it would enable her to travel and also understand the Aerospace Engineering theory she learnt and possibly view necessary innovations for the future.

    One of my MC brothers is a pilot for Singapore Airlines flying a tricked out jumbo for rich racehorse owners to be flown around the world.

    My wife has also a lot of contacts in aviation from her business dealings with the large corporations, but she will not employ our daughter, as she does not believe in nepotism or having relatives working for her: a somewhat unique POV for an Asian, especially an Asian mother. She will, however, use her contacts to get our daughter work placement both as an intern and eventual full time employee, as I will with my contact base.

    In sum, I believe a potential Uni student needs to identify their career path (not easy I know), and then choose their major(s) with a long-term commitment to a future career path where the choice of degree is imperative to said industry for future growth.

    I could write so much on this, but feel I have gone on too much already. ☺

    China & RH
    Good luck to both your career aspirations.

    Charlie
    Saw your comments late last night.

    Completely agree with your Allegri then Vieira thinking.

    Some time ago I read in a broadsheet UK newspaper an argument put forward that a BA gained in the UK adds too much debt for its viability to a student where it takes around 10 years to pay off the student debts. The argument was asking if a BA today was really worth the debt and pain and misery vs. what real opportunities it affords the student.

    It went on to illuminate the ways employers did far more penetrating background checks on potential candidates, such as delving deeply into a person’s social media, taking a hair sample for drug testing and much more I can’t remember this morning. Combined with this are a series of test that evaluate the potential employees’ mental and emotional ambiguity/stability/adroitness as well as tests for other suitability factors.

    It was a thought evoking and well-put together argument article.

    Thailand last year made a new law that employers had to pay a minimum of 15,000 THB (around £320) a month for an under graduate employee.

    Without a degree a person would have to work as a footpath seller: food or otherwise or do something self-employed, such as a tour guide or manual labour.

    Sadly, the BA is of limited value because of its devaluation due to it being gained by the masses. I’d suggest that a BA today is the equivalent of the old ‘O’ and ‘A’ levels.

    Only a graduate degree will get you through to interviews for 1st line management positions, which seem to be very prevalent in the current academic climate.

    I often talk to some of our Rotary Club member employers where the general consensus is that degrees are too easily obtainable, but yet still a prerequisite to be considered for an interview.

    I can substantiate this much further as I was involved in management training for government senior agency departments’ senior management personnel and corporations foreign/local here as well as writing Master degree management syllabus case studies (for one of the top Unis here) gaining from my 25+ years of international business, in a similar way I believe to the Harvard model some years ago.

    Whether it is still used now I have no idea. Perhaps Bamford can spread light on this.

    When I arrived here in 1999 Thai management structures were still ‘Top Down’ where I was tasked with instructing horizontal structures used then & today. This was made exceedingly difficult at first because of the Thai “Greng Jai” hierarchy/age culture that would take too long to explain here.

    http://phil.uk.net/thailand/greng-jai.html

    There have been some interesting comments from my post yesterday, so I’ll state my belief here on this.

    ‘Gaining a degree shows an employer that you are able to study for 3/4 years where one takes in the information and then regurgitates it for mid and final exams.’

    Regardless of a person’s transcripts and final GPA the degree does not explain a person’s intellect or their ability to use what they have learnt.

    My experience over my 40+ years career is that the higher one’s education the further they are likely to be on the spectrum. No disrespect meant to PhD2020 or any other PhD here.

    It seems the higher one goes up the spectrum the less filtered, less patient and more anal they become. Doctors are good indicators of this as are professors. I have a few friends who are doctors and my heart team of 8 years are also people I’m very close to.

    This includes both my wife and me. We both have a hyperactivity trait with limited filters and this has been passed to our son who has ADHA and will possibly need home schooling due to his focus issues. He’s no savant but in some areas he is vastly ahead of his years, such as his English ability is that of a freshman at Uni as his math’s abilities.

    Our 21-year-old adopted daughter (wife’s niece) says our filters less discussions heated or otherwise are not to be missed.

    With your correct devalued degree thinking in mind, my wife and I had some tough talks with our daughter regarding her future. Fortunately she excels at maths and science/technology where she eventually decided to go into a form of engineering because of potential work/career longevity for the next 40 years.

    This led her to choosing a double degree program of Aerospace Engineering and business (probably same as my wife: MBA) in Bangkok and Australia.

    The cost is £150, 000 for the 2 degrees and probably won’t stop there because I offered for her to train to be a pilot after graduating from both degrees. My thinking it would enable her to travel and also understand the Aerospace Engineering theory she learnt and possibly view necessary innovations for the future.

    One of my MC brothers is a pilot for Singapore Airlines flying a tricked out jumbo for rich racehorse owners to be flown around the world.

    My wife has also a lot of contacts in aviation from her business dealings with the large corporations, but she will not employ our daughter, as she does not believe in nepotism or having relatives working for her: a somewhat unique POV for an Asian, especially an Asian mother. She will, however, use her contacts to get our daughter work placement both as an intern and eventual full time employee, as I will with my contact base.

    In sum, I believe a potential Uni student needs to identify their career path (not easy I know), and then choose their major(s) with a long-term commitment to a future career path where the choice of degree is imperative to said industry for future growth.

    I could write so much on this, but feel I have gone on too much already. ☺

    China & RH
    Good luck to both your career aspirations.

    Charlie
    Saw your comments late last night.

    Completely agree with your Allegri then Vieira thinking.

    Some time ago I read in a broadsheet UK newspaper an argument put forward that a BA gained in the UK adds too much debt for its viability to a student where it takes around 10 years to pay off the student debts. The argument was asking if a BA today was really worth the debt and pain and misery vs. what real opportunities it affords the student.

    It went on to illuminate the ways employers did far more penetrating background checks on potential candidates, such as delving deeply into a person’s social media, taking a hair sample for drug testing and much more I can’t remember this morning. Combined with this are a series of test that evaluate the potential employees’ mental and emotional ambiguity/stability/adroitness as well as tests for other suitability factors.

    It was a thought evoking and well-put together argument article.

    Thailand last year made a new law that employers had to pay a minimum of 15,000 THB (around £320) a month for an under graduate employee.

    Without a degree a person would have to work as a footpath seller: food or otherwise or do something self-employed, such as a tour guide or manual labour.

    Sadly, the BA is of limited value because of its devaluation due to it being gained by the masses. I’d suggest that a BA today is the equivalent of the old ‘O’ and ‘A’ levels.

    Only a graduate degree will get you through to interviews for 1st line management positions, which seem to be very prevalent in the current academic climate.

    I often talk to some of our Rotary Club member employers where the general consensus is that degrees are too easily obtainable, but yet still a prerequisite to be considered for an interview.

    I can substantiate this much further as I was involved in management training for government senior agency departments’ senior management personnel and corporations foreign/local here as well as writing Master degree management syllabus case studies (for one of the top Unis here) gaining from my 25+ years of international business, in a similar way I believe to the Harvard model some years ago.

    Whether it is still used now I have no idea. Perhaps Bamford can spread light on this.

    When I arrived here in 1999 Thai management structures were still ‘Top Down’ where I was tasked with instructing horizontal structures used then & today. This was made exceedingly difficult at first because of the Thai “Greng Jai” hierarchy/age culture that would take too long to explain here.

    http://phil.uk.net/thailand/greng-jai.html

    There have been some interesting comments from my post yesterday, so I’ll state my belief here on this.

    ‘Gaining a degree shows an employer that you are able to study for 3/4 years where one takes in the information and then regurgitates it for mid and final exams.’

    Regardless of a person’s transcripts and final GPA the degree does not explain a person’s intellect or their ability to use what they have learnt.

    My experience over my 40+ years career is that the higher one’s education the further they are likely to be on the spectrum. No disrespect meant to PhD2020 or any other PhD here.

    It seems the higher one goes up the spectrum the less filtered, less patient and more anal they become. Doctors are good indicators of this as are professors. I have a few friends who are doctors and my heart team of 8 years are also people I’m very close to.

    This includes both my wife and me. We both have a hyperactivity trait with limited filters and this has been passed to our son who has ADHA and will possibly need home schooling due to his focus issues. He’s no savant but in some areas he is vastly ahead of his years, such as his English ability is that of a freshman at Uni as his math’s abilities.

    Our 21-year-old adopted daughter (wife’s niece) says our filters less discussions heated or otherwise are not to be missed.

    With your correct devalued degree thinking in mind, my wife and I had some tough talks with our daughter regarding her future. Fortunately she excels at maths and science/technology where she eventually decided to go into a form of engineering because of potential work/career longevity for the next 40 years.

    This led her to choosing a double degree program of Aerospace Engineering and business (probably same as my wife: MBA) in Bangkok and Australia.

    The cost is £150, 000 for the 2 degrees and probably won’t stop there because I offered for her to train to be a pilot after graduating from both degrees. My thinking it would enable her to travel and also understand the Aerospace Engineering theory she learnt and possibly view necessary innovations for the future.

    One of my MC brothers is a pilot for Singapore Airlines flying a tricked out jumbo for rich racehorse owners to be flown around the world.

    My wife has also a lot of contacts in aviation from her business dealings with the large corporations, but she will not employ our daughter, as she does not believe in nepotism or having relatives working for her: a somewhat unique POV for an Asian, especially an Asian mother. She will, however, use her contacts to get our daughter work placement both as an intern and eventual full time employee, as I will with my contact base.

    In sum, I believe a potential Uni student needs to identify their career path (not easy I know), and then choose their major(s) with a long-term commitment to a future career path where the choice of degree is imperative to said industry for future growth.

    I could write so much on this, but feel I have gone on too much already. ☺

    China & RH
    Good luck to both your career aspirations.

  11. Tony

    Charlie, with our time differences I think you may have missed a lengthy post i made re training and health matters you ask questions about.

    If this is the case let me know and I’ll repost at a quieter time as I think you’ll find the data collecting info both unusual and possibly interesting.

    I don’t want to clog up the blog more than I have this morning.

  12. Emiratesstroller

    Last season the Maitland-Niles and Mustafi combination on right side of defence was considered disastrous and the same has occurred with AMN
    and Sokratis this season.

    In the two Cup Games where Chambers played alongside Mustafi the team have not conceded a goal and look far more solid defensively.

    I have made the case many times this season and last that AMN lacks the
    defensive quality and positional sense to be RB and that despite his shortcomings Chambers would be in absence of Bellerin to be a better option.

    My view is that Mustafi might prove to better option alongside Holding in CB
    positions than Sokratis and Luiz. Whether Emery will play that combination in EPL is perhaps unlikely.

  13. China1

    Thanks tony and good luck to your kids as well in both respects

    Btw, I think there may yet be more room to manouvre between different career paths than most people tend to believe, I say this both from my own experience and also from observing senior management in standard chartered as a kind of case study

    My degree and master’s are in town planning, but due to visa complications not enabling my wife to stay in the UK after she finished university I came to China. Due to a lack of town planning opportunities for foreign post grads wit hno knowledge of chinese town planning or even the language, the only job I could seriously look at was teaching English – so I did.

    So I taught kids for 2 years then picked up some part time work with adults. Went to standard chartered’s tianjinese technology subsidiary basically on a whim but ended up in a surprisingly unique role whereby I was responsible for improving the communication skills and soft skills of all 800 tech staff through any means necessary.

    I was working on the junior staff but also helping the senior management which gave me a lot of exposure and was given a 6 month project in a tech related event and the combination of my regular work and the project going well was enough to let me switch to this tech PM role.

    So I myself have made 3 major career direction transitions by the age of 30 and *so far* thankfully haven’t had to take any backwards steps along the way.

    I also noticed that senior management in this company often don’t have bachelors in anything related to finance, banking or technology which is interesting though. Our CEO got a bachelors in liberal arts or something I forget. One of my senior managers only has a BA but it’s also in physics of all subjects. For many of the tech stuff we recruit as developers, they sometimes have zero background in IT and just studied finance or maths etc – despite the fact they’re going to be a developer or tester

    I think there’s a huge amount of scope for changing directions regardless of what your degree is in, but I do believe it requires a combination of needing to seek out opportunities you don’t necessarily ‘qualify’ for to try your luck. You also need to be in the right place at the right time in terms of being at a company or under management that recognize transferable skills rather than an overtly traditional mindset about recruitment

  14. China1

    For the record I acknowledge how ironic that is that I write horribly written posts here addled with errors and messily formulated despite previously being employed in communication skills coaching and English teaching

    But as you can probably already tell, zero fucks are given on my part to making an effort on a football blog post comments section lol. No offense Pedro 🙂

  15. Sid

    Mustafi is a big NO in the epl, play him in cup competitions to keep his value then sell in the summer as well as papasaucrisis,
    only Torr is a DM, luiz chambers are not but could work in a system as part of 3CBs
    Having said that Haka out!

  16. Tony

    Thanks China for the well wishes and insight into some canny moves you’ve made in your career.

    I give you serious kudos & sincere respect for learning Chinese and driving your career to very good levels for your age in a very untrusting country.

    I believe from my wife that the Chinese can be very Xenophobic and mistrusting of other nationalities, which they’ve instilled in the Thais. My wife’s family are Chinese-Thai going back to the Chinese indoctrination of Thailand since 1910.

    During such indoctrination the Chinese kept telling the Thais “Beware of the westerners” while slowly improving their will on the country and its people.

    My MC club has a chapter in Beijing where I’ve heard some crazy stories regarding foreigners in China.

    I advised on a dissertation of ‘The Chinese family history in Thailand’ that was 200+ pages of fascinating insight how the Chinese came to Thailand and took over the country without firing a shot.

    Essentially Thais can be very lazy where the hard working Chinese took advantage of this to secure position and amass land holdings from 1910 onwards.
    They changed so many things where back then prostitutes were Chinese, but they quickly reversed this to be Thai women.

    Degrees open initial doors but it’s the people’s attributes/skill sets and how they use them that creates the platform from where to succeed.

    You seem to have set a strong foundation in your career platform and obviously are the proactive type that goes on to find the success and financial trappings they deserve on merit and initiative.

    It won’t be a straight path to success but from what I read from you, you have what it takes.

    I hope you keep us abreast of your future movements. I certainly will watch with genuine interest and no doubt you’ll be an inspiration to others who yearn to work in other countries.

  17. Receding Hairline

    China agree with you on the room to maneuver bit, one isn’t wedded to what he first studied at Uni. My first degree was in Agricultural and Environmental resource engineering. Made the decision to switch to IT when it became obvious jobs in my field were non existent to an extent.

  18. Normski

    Pierre

    Absolutely bang on the money at 00.35.

    The reason other football supporters laugh at The Arsenal are dickheads like that. The lack of self awareness is astounding.

    Bamford

    ‘I say this just so that certain people better understand some of the dynamics here.’

    You don’t have a clue about the dynamics anywhere let some on here as you’re so out of touch and so misinformed, so back in your box and worry about your own POV.

  19. Bojangles

    My comment has been deleted again. Pedro I’d rather you ban me than stop me commenting through deletion. You allow dick-wads like ol’ Norm to abuse anybody he likes but you seem offended by my posts, which abuse nobody. Not sure if this one will make it.

  20. Sid

    NormskiSeptember 25, 2019 07:05:01
    Tony are you ok? Hope you’re not having a stroke.
    Its wrong but cant help it I burst out laughing

  21. Silverhawk

    Receeding

    I myself have been considering changing career path.
    Studied real estate in the uni. But I’ve been thinking about working in the IT sector.

    Any pointers you can lay down for me?

  22. Silverhawk

    Tony

    I always love it when people talk about taking their chances internationally.

    I listen/read with avid interest.

    I myself I’m applying for a Canadian PR.
    The aim is to go there and establish myself as a facility manager but now I’m considering switching to an IT related field.

    Any advice you can give me?.

  23. Sid

    Left TesticleSeptember 25, 2019 07:50:23
    Sid,
    Are you aware of Tonys health problems?
    Sorry for it, the internet…. nature of the beast.

  24. Northbanker

    Really enjoyable match last night even though got soaked
    No real opposition of course but great all the same to see so many youngsters excel

    Interesting that despite being still a teenager Guendouzi is already a senior player and therefore completely bypasses this tournament

    Really strikes me watching Martinelli last night that if we can continue each year to find just one teenage gem at the £6m mark as with Guen and GM we would be able to take on the big budget teams very successfully. Holding also represents that strategy as a £3m signing a couple of years ago

  25. China1

    Haha receding seems like we have quite a few parallels in a sense then

    Ironically tho I didn’t know what to study at uni because I’m interested in almost everything but don’t have an individual passion for too many specific subjects – so I decided town planning would be a good choice as it leads to a specific career if you’re not sure what you want to do after uni and at least if I did want to change I’d have a degree in something

    I was actually already in a classroom in China with a class full of 3 year olds before i Knew what was happening!

    Funny how life works out that way sometimes

    @tony cheers to you boyo

  26. China1

    Tony these days you needn’t expect much racism or xenophobia towards white westerners, especially the British.

    There is a lot of curiosity tho. Staring from stranger is pretty common place as well as frequent personal questions from taxi drivers like how much do you earn etc lol. If you leave the first tier cities the education levels tend to drop off substantially tho so there’s much more staring out there

    The reality is for me there is white privilege here. Locals will trust white foreigners to be qualified and capable English teachers without a moments notice for example – even if said English teacher is actually a uni student from Slovenia…

    As well there’s a lot of misunderstanding of chinese culture from westerners because they fundamentally think differently. For example here staring is not considered particularly rude and doesn’t really make people feel uncomfortable, so when they stare at a foreigner they’re usually just curious and having a good look rather than thinking anything negative

    Same for the pushing in line all the time. If you’re in a hurry it’s no big deal to jump in at the front. 90% of the time it’s a given that you must be in a big hurry if you’re pushing in so it’s geberally accepted as no big deal

    For us it’s really annoying but it’s still easy to overthink it when in reality they often just see things differently

  27. Normski

    Bojangles…..yawn

    Another social justice warrior triggered.

    What exactly is the issue? In fact don’t bother responding, I don’t give a fuck what you’re upset about.

    There’s no abuse so get a grip.

  28. Receding Hairline

    Silverhawk one word..Certifications

    The Head of IT support Services at the bank i work with studied Biochemistry

    Start off with ITIL which is basically a must have then decide on what part of IT interests you

    COBIT 5 is also a nice one to have if IT governance interests you

    It’s really a broad field and as a facility manager i guess you already have some project management certifications

  29. Bamford10

    Pierre

    “This is EXACTLY what happened at Arsenal. EXACTLY..”

    Except that it isn’t. At all.

    One, Spurs are one month into a season in which things aren’t going as they want them to; at Arsenal, we were anywhere from three to ten years into a period of underachievement, incompetence and inadequacy.

    Two, whatever is going on with Spurs at the moment, I don’t know that any of it is down to Pochettino’s limitations or to incompetence on his part; at Arsenal, ALL of our stagnation and underachievement was down to Wenger’s limitations and incompetence.

    Three, whatever limitations Pochettino may have, he is not clueless, and he is not incompetent. I realize that you may still not he able to see this, but Arsene Wenger in his second ten years was in fact clueless and he was in fact incompetent.

    So, aside from some superficial similarity, the two situations have very little in common.